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Non-pet dogs as sentinels and potential synanthropic reservoirs of tick-borne and zoonotic bacteria

Veterinary Microbiology publish this investigation article

December 27th, 2013

Blood samples were collected from 100 shepherd dogs, 12 hunting dogs and 14 stray dogs (apparently healthy) in southern Hungary to screen for the presence of emerging tick-borne pathogens. Based on real-time PCR results, 14 dogs (11%) had single or dual haemoplasma infection, and a same number of samples were positive for Anaplasma phagocytophilum. In one sample Coxiella burnetii was molecularly identified, and 20.3% of dogs seroconverted to the Q fever agent. Rickettsaemia (sensu stricto) was also detected in one animal. This is the first molecular evidence of autochthonous infection of dogs with the above pathogens in Hungary. The relatively high prevalence of haemoplasma and anaplasma infection among non-pet dogs is suggestive of a prolonged carrier status and bacteraemia of these animals rendering them epidemiologically significant as potential reservoirs and sentinels for tick-borne infections




Hornok S., Denes B., Meli ML., Tanczos B., Fekete L., Gyuranecz M., de la Fuente J., Fernandez de Mera IG., Farkas R. and Hofmann-Lehmann R.




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Non-pet dogs as sentinels and potential synanthropic reservoirs of tick-borne and zoonotic bacteria

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Non-pet dogs as sentinels and potential synanthropic reservoirs of tick-borne and zoonotic bacteria


Participants:

Faculty of Veterinary Science. Szent István University (SZIU).

Veterinary Diagnostic Directorate. National Food Chain Safety Office (NFCSO).

University of ZurichVetsuisse Faculty. Clinical Laboratory. University of Zurich (UZH).

Veterinary Medical Research Institute (VMRI). Hungarian Academy of Sciences.

Gobierno de Castilla-La ManchaSanidad y Biotecnología (SaBio). Instituto de Investigación en Recursos Cinegéticos (IREC). Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas (CSIC). Universidad de Castilla La Mancha (UCLM). Gobierno de Castilla-La Mancha (JCCM).

Oklahoma State UniversityDepartament of Veterinary Pathobiology. Center for Veterinary Health Sciences (CVHS). Oklahoma State University (OSU).

Universidad ComplutenseCentro de Vigilancia Sanitaria Veterinaria (VISAVET). Universidad Complutense (UCM).

Universidad ComplutenseDepartamento de Sanidad Animal. Facultad de Veterinaria. Universidad Complutense (UCM).







Veterinary Microbiology
FACTOR YEAR Q
2.726 2013

NLMID: 7705469

PMID: 24021884

ISSN: 0378-1135



TITLE: Non-pet dogs as sentinels and potential synanthropic reservoirs of tick-borne and zoonotic bacteria


JOURNAL: Vet. Microbiol.


NUMERACIÓN: 167(3-4):700-3


AÑO: 2013


PUBLISHER: Elsevier Science Publishers


AUTHORS: Hornok S., Denes B., Meli ML., Tanczos B., Fekete L., Gyuranecz M., de la Fuente J., Fernandez de Mera IG., Farkas R. and Hofmann-Lehmann R.


DOI: https://doi.org/ 10.1016/j.vetmic.2013.08.011


CITE THIS PUBLICATION:

Hornok S., Denes B., Meli ML., Tanczos B., Fekete L., Gyuranecz M., de la Fuente J., Fernandez de Mera IG., Farkas R. and Hofmann-Lehmann R. Non-pet dogs as sentinels and potential synanthropic reservoirs of tick-borne and zoonotic bacteria. Veterinary Microbiology. 167(3-4):700-3. 2013. (A). ISSN: 0378-1135. DOI: 10.1016/j.vetmic.2013.08.011