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Is targeted removal a suitable means for tuberculosis control in wild boar?

Preventive Veterinary Medicine publica este artículo de investigación

1 de diciembre de 2016

We assessed the suitability of targeted removal as a means for tuberculosis (TB) control on an intensely managed Eurasian wild boar (Sus scrofa) hunting estate. The 60km2 large study area included one capture (treatment) site, one control site, and one release site. Each site was fenced. In the summers of 2012, 2013 and 2014, 929 wild boar were live-captured on the treatment site. All wild boar were micro-chipped and tested using an animal side lateral flow test immediately after capture in order to detect antibodies to the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTC). The wild boar were released according to their TB status: Seropositive individuals onto the release site (hunted after summer), and seronegative individuals back onto the treatment site. The annual summer seroprevalence of antibodies to the MTC declined significantly in live-captured wild boar piglets from the treatment site, from 44% in 2012 to 27% in 2013 (a reduction of 39%). However, no significant further reduction was recorded in 2014, during the third capture season. Fall-winter MTC infection prevalence was calculated on the basis of the culture results obtained for hunter-harvested wild boar. No significant changes between hunting seasons were recorded on either the treatment site or the control site, and prevalence trends over time were similar on both sites. The fall-winter MTC infection prevalence on the release site increased significantly from 40% in 2011-2012 to 64% in 2012-2013 and 2013-2014 (60% increase). Recaptures indicated a persistently high infection pressure. This experiment, the first attempt to control TB in wild boar through targeted removal, failed to reduce TB prevalence when compared to the control site. However, it generated valuable knowledge on infection pressure and on the consequences of translocating TB-infected wild boar




Che Amat A., Armenteros JA., Gonzalez-Barrio D., Lima-Barbero JF., Diez-Delgado I., Barasona JA., Romero B., Lyashchenko KP., Ortiz JA. y Gortazar C.




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Is targeted removal a suitable means for tuberculosis control in wild boar?

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Is targeted removal a suitable means for tuberculosis control in wild boar?


Participantes:

Gobierno de Castilla-La ManchaSanidad y Biotecnología (SaBio). Instituto de Investigación en Recursos Cinegéticos (IREC). Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas (CSIC). Universidad de Castilla La Mancha (UCLM). Gobierno de Castilla-La Mancha (JCCM).

Universiti Putra MalaysiaFaculty of Veterinary Medicine. Universiti Putra Malaysia (UPM).

SabiotecSabiotec.

Universidad ComplutenseDepartamento de Sanidad Animal. Facultad de Veterinaria. Universidad Complutense (UCM).

Universidad ComplutenseServicio de Micobacterias (MYC). Centro de Vigilancia Sanitaria Veterinaria (VISAVET). Universidad Complutense (UCM).

Chembio Diagnostic Systems IncChembio Diagnostic Systems Inc.

Medianilla S.L.Medianilla S.L..







Preventive Veterinary Medicine
FACTOR YEAR Q
1.987 2016

NLMID: 8217463

PMID: 27843020

ISSN: 0167-5877



TÍTULO: Is targeted removal a suitable means for tuberculosis control in wild boar?


REVISTA: Prev. Vet. Med.


NUMERACIÓN: 135:132-135


AÑO: 2016


EDITORIAL: Elsevier Science Publishers


AUTORES: Che Amat A., Armenteros JA., Gonzalez-Barrio D., Lima-Barbero JF., Diez-Delgado I., Barasona JA., Romero B., Lyashchenko KP., Ortiz JA. and Gortazar C.


PARTICIPANTES VISAVET


6th
José Ángel Barasona García-Arévalo
7th
Beatriz Romero Martínez

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.prevetmed.2016.11.002


CITA ESTA PUBLICACIÓN:

Che Amat A., Armenteros JA., Gonzalez-Barrio D., Lima-Barbero JF., Diez-Delgado I., Barasona JA., Romero B., Lyashchenko KP., Ortiz JA. y Gortazar C. Is targeted removal a suitable means for tuberculosis control in wild boar?. Preventive Veterinary Medicine. 135:132-135. 2016. (A). ISSN: 0167-5877. DOI: 10.1016/j.prevetmed.2016.11.002


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