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The role of Mycobacteria in Veterinary Medicine

Conference in 31st Annual Congress of the European Society of Mycobacteriology (ESM 2010)

July 5th, 2010

Aranaz A., Bezos J., Romero B., Castellanos E., Rodriguez-Campos S., Casal C., Fernandez de Mera IG., Lozano F., Moya N., de Juan L., Mateos A. and Dominguez L.

Introduction. The species of the genus Mycobacterium are responsible of infections of veterinary interest that cause serious sanitary and economic impact. Several of these infections are zoonoses.
Objective. The tasks of a laboratory involve the diagnosis, identification and molecular characterisation of mycobacterial infections in livestock, pets, wildlife or exotic animals. This commitment contributes to the control of the infections.
Material and Methods. The protocol for diagnosis depends on the disease and animal species. It may involve the evaluation of reagents for the intra-dermal tuberculin tests, the gamma-interferon assay, ELISA tests, and bacteriological culture and identification using molecular methods (complex or species-specific PCRs,16S rRNA and hsp65 sequencing, probes, etc). Studies on epidemiology also vary according to the pathogen, thus isolates of the M. tuberculosis complex are currently fingerprinted using DVR-spoligotyping and variable number tandem repeats (VNTRs), and isolates within the M. avium complex are characterised by PFGE, RFLP, and VNTRs.
Results. Main etiological agents of tuberculosis in animals are M. bovis and M. caprae, which affect domestic animals (cattle, goats) and wildlife (badger, deer, wild boar, lynx). M. tuberculosis complex organisms may also infect pets (dogs, cats) and zoo animals (elephants, primates, pinnipedae). Molecular characterisation allows identification of outbreaks and knowledge of reservoirs. Other relevant mycobacteria include M. avium paratuberculosis in ruminant
species, M. a. avium in birds and raptors, M. a. hominissuis in swine, and atypical mycobacteria such as M. genavense in birds, M. nonchoromogenicum, M. fortuitum and M. chelonae in reptiles and turtles, or M. peregrinum and M. marinum in fishes.
Discussion. A complete and accurate identification of these mycobacteria in human patients is needed to assess the presence of the zoonoses. In this way, a close collaboration with human health laboratories is essential




Participants:

Universidad ComplutenseServicio de Micobacterias (MYC). Centro de Vigilancia Sanitaria Veterinaria (VISAVET). Universidad Complutense (UCM).

Universidad ComplutenseDepartamento de Sanidad Animal. Facultad de Veterinaria. Universidad Complutense (UCM).


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The role of Mycobacteria in Veterinary Medicine


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31st Annual Congress of the European Society of Mycobacteriology (ESM 2010)


31st Annual Congress of the European Society of Mycobacteriology (ESM 2010)
July 4th-7th, 2010
Bled
Slovenia

TITLE: The role of Mycobacteria in Veterinary Medicine


TYPE: Oral communication


AUTHORS: Aranaz A., Bezos J., Romero B., Castellanos E., Rodriguez-Campos S., Casal C., Fernandez de Mera IG., Lozano F., Moya N., de Juan L., Mateos A. and Dominguez L.


VISAVET PARTICIPANTS


2nd
Javier Bezos Garrido
3rd
Beatriz Romero Martínez
8th
Francisco Javier Lozano Barrilero
9th
Nuria Moya Álvarez
10
Lucía de Juan Ferré
Last
Lucas Domínguez Rodríguez

DATE: July 5th, 2010


CITE THIS COMMUNICATION:

Aranaz A., Bezos J., Romero B., Castellanos E., Rodriguez-Campos S., Casal C., Fernandez de Mera IG., Lozano F., Moya N., de Juan L., Mateos A. and Dominguez L. The role of Mycobacteria in Veterinary Medicine. 31st Annual Congress of the European Society of Mycobacteriology (ESM 2010), European Society of Mycobacteriology, Bled, Slovenia, July 5th, 2010. (Oral communication)


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